Help selecting boat for San Francisco bay

General boating discussion
Imhisnibbs
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2020 5:08 pm

Help selecting boat for San Francisco bay

#1

Post by Imhisnibbs »

Hi
I’m looking to get an aluminum boat for multiple use.
I’m looking for a deep V about 20 feet
One I can fish in San Francisco Bay and occasionally go out in the ocean when waves/swell are 6 feet or less
Then, in winter, I want to be able to put a blind on it to hunt the wetlands in San Francisco Bay so the draft can’t be too deep.

I preferably Want a boat with marsh camouflage decal/paint

Does anybody have a boat they would suggest I look at?
Haven’t decided between rivets/weld yet


Thank you!

Imhisnibbs

kmorin
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Re: Help selecting boat for San Francisco bay

#2

Post by kmorin »

Imhisnibbs wrote:
Sat Jun 27, 2020 5:21 pm
I’m looking for a deep V about 20 feet
But...
Imhisnibbs wrote:
Sat Jun 27, 2020 5:21 pm
Then, in winter, I want to be able to put a blind on it to hunt the wetlands in San Francisco Bay so the draft can’t be too deep.
Imhisnibbs, can't help but notice you're describing two separate boats?- Not a "multipurpose" boat- as there is no way to get both- Deep V and Shallow draft are mutually exclusive hull designs.

Once the boat is riveted/welded built with one deadrise- that's pretty much it! What you need is a jon boat for the flat's work, (like Monarch) and then a salt water skiff with some V so you can handle seas.

Good Luck!!

Cheers,
Kevin Morin
Kenai, AK
kmorin

Fisherman
Posts: 204
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 8:24 pm

Re: Help selecting boat for San Francisco bay

#3

Post by Fisherman »

Hi, I fish those same waters...out the gate and into Suisun Bay and the delta.

I have a 20' aluminum as well.

The difference of a "deep vee" and "shallow draft" in a 20' boat is not going to be more than 6-8" at the stern on the hull...not a lot of difference. The other factor on draft will be prop vs jet. I can't recommend a jet offshore though.

There are a lot of manufactures in the 20' boat market. North River is very common for example. I run a 2005 Fish Rite; very similar hull design to North River. I'll probably be selling my boat this year since I'm upgrading to a 28' boat.

If you want to use the boat for both purposes, you'd probably be better designing it for offshore and secondarily for duck hunting (I presume that's what you're thinking for shallow draft / camo reasoning) if you can't go the two boat route. I'd rather run a boat designed for both the ocean offshore and inshore than an inshore boat offshore. Where you go in the bays and delta will be more determined by time of tides than by the draft on your boat anyways. I like I said before, the difference in draft between the two hulls you mentioned is relatively small unless you go to flat bottom with a jet.

kmorin
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Re: Help selecting boat for San Francisco bay

#4

Post by kmorin »

fisherman, 'nibbs,
there are a few considerations to make in regard draft of the two hull groups 'nibbs' may want to review briefly as he considers the different hull forms.

since we don't have any definition of the actual acceptable draft for either hulls' waters, I'll remark that open, salt water boats rarely have any reason to consider a few inches of draft in design or operation? However, that might not be said of 'shallow draft' all depending on the not defined terms.

In any case of a planing boat the first draft consideration is not the hull shape alone. The engine size/hp/prop and skeg of a planing boat almost always defines the full draft of the hull. When planing, the deep V hull's leg below the running waterline is going to be the anti-cav plate to skeg tip depth- minimum.

The flat bottom/jon boat/scow hull boat is going to be the same- but may draw less due to lower hp to plane that hull. Flat water rarely needs the open ocean horse power that would be typical for safe steering in a swell.

So there might be 4-6" difference in the hull's depth plus an added 3-6" of Anti-cav to skeg depth if there are different horse power engines used?

So there are easy to find scenarios where they will be a foot of draft difference between flat's boats and open ocean boats, sitting at rest at the design waterlines. When they run? again the difference will be the V drawing some significant draft plus the leg, and the flat bottom drawing almost nothing plus the leg's wheel and skeg depth.

If we don't define shoal draft, shallow draft, or get some numbers involved- making design decisions is pretty close to 'not possible'. On the other hand, if the terms are defined you could take various hulls' design (displacement at rest vs planing) and performance (engine required and implied prop and skeg dimensions) and begin to see if the shoal water work can be done by the salt water hull?

Another consideration we learn from the very shoal water prop boats: Bass Boats where a flat bottom shape is used but the engine is on an 'jack' and is vertically raised into the 'roostertail' or wake rise of a planing hull and the draft then is much reduced while running and the engine can be clear of the water while at rest.

Defining shallow, if its a deep as 14"-20" ? then most open ocean salt water V hulls will work. If the definition is a few inches of water? then just the deep V hull will run aground without considering the engine's draft.

'nibbs, A few more things to consider when planning to operate in the salt marshes you describe with a hull that will run well off shore.

Cheers,
Kevin Morin
Kenai, AK
kmorin

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