PFD, Type 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5

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welder
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PFD, Type 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5

Post by welder » Fri Jan 22, 2010 9:30 pm

PFD - Personal Flotation Device - Life Jackets

The most important fishing accessory is having and wearing a proper personal flotation device (PFD). If you spend time on the water you need to be prepared for anything that could possibly happen.

A personal flotation device can save the life of the most experienced swimmer. Don't ever be guilty of falling into the "macho-man trap". There have been many a macho-men that have drowned because they were too embarrassed to wear a life jacket.

There are five types of personal flotation devices. In selecting a PFD, it must be Coast Guard approved. Choosing the correct PFD is essential for boating safety. This is especially true if children are to be in the boat.

Types of PFDs

A Type 1 PFD provides the most buoyancy and is better known as an "Offshore Life Jacket". This life jacket is recommended for any type of water conditions from rough, remote to open waters. This type of life jacket is designed to turn an unconscious person face-up. The Type 1 PFD is ideal for children and non-swimmers.

A Type 2 PFD provides the next level of protection. Better known as a "Near Shore Vest". This life jacket is better suited for inland rivers, lakes and ponds. It is somewhat less effective as a Type 1 in turning an unconscious person face-up.

Again, this is a very good selection for small children, infants and non-swimmers.

A Type 3 PFD is designed to be used for inland waters, such as ponds and lakes. The protection value is not as effective as a Type 1 or Type 2 PFD, as this life jacket does not have the functional ability to turn an unconscious wearer face-up.

The Type 3 PFD is more widely used as fishing vest or in other various water sports activities. A Type 3 PFD is qualified in many inflatable fishing vest. This type is more often worn by fishermen because of the ease of use, compact, light, comfortable and cool to wear.

A Type 4 PFD is also intended for calm inland waters such as ponds or lakes and is not to be confused as a life jacket. Better known as a "Throwable Device" and in no way serves as a proper PFD.

Boaters may use this type as seat cushions that could double for a thrown flotation device to be held by a person until rescued.

A Type 5 PFD is not actually any form of life jacket and serves little purpose as a flotation device. The Type 5 variety includes wet suits, deck suits or work vest. There are Hybris PFDs that offer small buoyancy with an inflatable chamber.

Always place safe boating at the top of the list. Be prepared for any boating condition. Storms can approach quickly, accidents can happen to anyone. Be responsible for yourself and any passenger you may have aboard by requiring that all occupants wear the appropriate personal flotation device (PFD).
Lester,
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PFD, Type 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5

Post by welder » Sat Jan 23, 2010 7:26 pm

More on PFDs


Life Jackets Float, You Don't!

Drowning is the No. 1 cause of death in boating accidents, and 90 percent of the people who drowned weren't wearing a life jacket. Are you wearing yours? In 2008 eleven children under age thirteen lost their lives while boating, of those 63% died from drowning.

The Federal law requires that all recreational boats carry one Type I, II, III, or V Personal Flotation Device or PFD for each person on board or on a water ski behind you. If your boat is over 16 feet (except canoes and kayaks), you must also have a Type IV Throw Cushion or life ring.

Use only life jackets and life preservers that have a label indicating that they are tested by the Underwriters Laboratories (UL) and approved by the US Coast Guard (USCG). Life jackets are labeled by type (1, 2, 3, 4) or (I, II, III, IV) and designate for whom they are designed to fit (child or adult).

Type I: “Off-Shore” PFD’s float the best and are designed for rough water. They are capable of turning an unconscious person from face down to face up.
Type II: “Near-Shore” PFD’s can keep an unconscious person’s face upright and out of the water but does not do as good of job of turning the unconscious person from the face down to the face up position. They are only intended for calm protected waters.
Type III: “Sport” or “Floatation Aid” PFD’s are only to be worn during wet boating activities like water-skiing, sail boarding or kayaking. They do not have the ability to keep an unconscious person’s face out of the water.

Type IV: “Throw Cushions” or “Life Rings” are required on boats over 16 feet (except canoes and kayaks). These devices must be ready to deploy to a person who falls overboard, they are not a substitute for a lifejacket. There are several types including cushions with two handle straps, life ring and horseshoe shaped.
Type V: “Special Use” PFD’s are intended for specific activities and may only be counted if worn, be sure to check the label for its intended use. Some varieties include deck suits, work vests, safety harness’s and board sailing, and some may contain hypothermia protection.

Inflatable Life Vests

Inflatable life vest's must be USCG approved and all status indicators must be green to satisfy the onboard PFD requirement. Remember to pay careful attention to the condition and inspect the device at least once a year. Inflatable life vest's are not allowed to be worn by people under 16 years old.
Youth Life Vest

Children under the age of 13 are required by Federal Law to wear a life vest at all times unless below decks or in a closed cabin. Please check with your local authorities. Make sure the life vest is the right size for the child. To check, put the life vest on the child, then attempt to lift the child by the jacket shoulders. If the jacket comes up 3 inches or more before it lifts the child, then it is too big. A child's PFD should also have a crotch strap, lifting ring and a flotation collar. It should always be worn as instructed with all straps belted. Remember, life jackets and life preservers should never be substitutes for adult supervision. Blow-up water wings, toys, rafts, and air mattresses should never be used as life jackets or life preservers, they are not safe!
Pet Life Jacket

Pets should also be considered for floatation devices. It is not uncommon for a pet to fall overboard, become disorientated and swim away from the boat or in circles. Drowning can occur once the pet has tired.


PFD Flotation

There are three basic kinds of PFD flotation in the five types of PFD’s with the following characteristics:

1) Inherently Buoyant Life jackets (primarily foam)
- Adult in types I, II, III & V
- Youth in types II, III & V
- Child in type II
- Infant in type II
- Throwable type IV
- Used by swimmers and non-swimmers
- Some are used for water sports

2) Inflatable lifejacket’s

- Used for adults only in type I, II, III & V
- Recommended for swimmers only
- Only wearable styles (no throwables)
- Compact
- May only be counted if worn

3) Hybrid Life Preservers (foam & inflation)
- Adult in types II, III & V
- Youth in types II, III & V
- Child in type II
- Only wearable styles (no throwables)
- Used by swimmers and non-swimmers
- Some are used for water sports

All PFD’s must be USCG approved, in good serviceable condition and the appropriate size for the intended person. An adult PFD on a child could force the face under water and a child’s PFD on an adult will not give sufficient buoyancy. It is vital that the PFD be available and ready to put on quickly in case of an emergency. The PFD’s should be readily accessible (do not store in locked compartments or under other gear). Remember to remove the plastic bag the PFD came in. Throwable devices must not be stored; they must be available for immediate use in case someone goes overboard.

Most states require wearing a life vest while being towed such as water skiing, wake boarding and tubing or while riding a personal watercraft (PWC). Use life vest's marked for these particular activities. White water rafting and sail boarding may also require the use of life vests, please check with your
Lester,
PacificV2325, Honda BF225
2386

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